July 05-06, 2023 — 7.22 Release Notes

The following new features and updates (enhancements, fixes, etc.) have been introduced in this release. If you have any questions, please contact Snowflake Support.

Important

Each release may include updates that require the web interface to be refreshed.

As a general practice, to ensure these updates do not impact your usage, we recommend refreshing the web interface after each Snowflake release has been deployed.

New Features

Deleting an Account (Self-service) — Preview

With this release, we are pleased to announce the preview of self-service account deletion. An organization administrator can now delete an account without contacting Snowflake Support.

An organization administrator starts the process of deleting an account by dropping it. Once dropped, the account enters a grace period during which the account can be restored (“undropped”). Snowflake automatically deletes the account when the grace period expires.

To support the process for deleting an account, this release also introduces the preview of a new syntax for the SHOW ORGANIZATION ACCOUNTS command. When the HISTORY keyword is appended to the command, the output contains dropped accounts along with additional columns such as scheduled deletion time.

For more information, see Dropping an Account.

Organization Usage: New REPLICATION_GROUP_USAGE_HISTORY View

With this release, we are pleased to announce the REPLICATION_GROUP_USAGE_HISTORY view in the Organization Usage schema. The REPLICATION_GROUP_USAGE_HISTORY view allows an organization administrator to obtain details about the replication usage in an organization.

For more information, see REPLICATION_GROUP_USAGE_HISTORY View.

SQL Updates

New SQL Functions

The following function(s) are now available with this release:

Function Category

New Function

Description

Context Functions (Session)

CURRENT_ORGANIZATION_NAME

Returns the name of the organization to which the current account belongs.

GROUP BY: New ALL Keyword

The GROUP BY clause now supports the ALL keyword, which specifies that all expressions in the SELECT list that do not use aggregate functions should be used for grouping.

For example, the following two statements yield the same result:

SELECT state, city, SUM(retail_price * quantity) AS gross_revenue
  FROM sales
  GROUP BY state, city;
Copy
SELECT state, city, SUM(retail_price * quantity) AS gross_revenue
  FROM sales
  GROUP BY ALL;
Copy